Teaching Piano When Life is Stressful

No one ever talks about this, but teaching piano lessons can be hard on days when you are stressed, sad or overwhelmed with concerns outside of the studio. It’s difficult to keep your mind on what a student is doing when you are weighted down with personal issues. Watching and listening to someone else play (especially beginning students) takes tremendous mental focus. As piano teachers, we aren’t able to excuse ourselves and leave the lesson. We can’t take phone calls or seem visibly upset during a lesson. We work with children; we must remain calm and cheerful, this can be challenging if there is a lot going on to distract you.

I know a thing or two about teaching during life’s challenging times. Keeping my own mind engaged and free from stress is a tall order on some days. I do my best to have a positive perspective at all times. But I am gloriously human and sometimes have trouble with this. I might be worried about a sick child, an upcoming recital, global warming, the price of tea in China, or anything else. If I let this overtake my mind, my teaching day can become a bit trying. Actually, it will become painfully difficult.

Here are some things that work for me on days where my stress level and concerns outside the studio are high. These ideas may work for you as well.

  • Leave Your Worries Outside

I imagine yourself leaving your troubles outside of the studio. This is your workspace. The ability to leave your outside life and focus on your work will take time to cultivate. If you are struggling more than usual on a particular day, write yourself a note about whatever is troubling you and leave it in another room or in your car. Tell yourself you can read the note and get upset or worry after you are finished teaching.

  • Live in the Moment, Focus on Your Student

Focus on the student. Look at your student—really look and consider the fact that you get to have this amazing person in your presence for 30-60 minutes. Enjoy her! She is unique and special.

I learned something about a from a Zen teacher.  He said to look around and survey your surroundings.  Consider that at this very moment nothing is wrong. Enjoy this moment.  Live in it be present. I look at whomever I am teaching at the moment and try to be thankful that I am able to be the teacher. I choose to be thankful for the impact I have on this wonderful person.

  • Be kind to yourself.

Have some fun!  Pick out a duet to sight read with your student, play a piano game, sing a song, tell a joke. Look at how cute your little ones are.  Have a short conversation with an adult student about the music they are working on. Ask your teens and tweens how their day is going.  Celebrate the work you are doing and be inspired by how far your students have come.

Sometimes a little treat can help. A small piece of dark chocolate can pick you up and boost your mood. The theory is that chocolate stimulates the neural activity in the regions of the brain associated with pleasure and reward.  A hot cup of tea on a cold day or a cool drink on a hot day can make you feel better on days when you need a little extra pampering.

Positive Perspective

Bad days will come and go. As musicians, we are especially skilled in the area of mental discipline. We are better able than most people to leave our worries behind and focus on our work.

This post is taken from the book “The Happiest Piano Teacher in Town”

Read it for free on Kindle Unlimited. Also available as an ebook or paperback.

Scripted Communication for Sticky Situations

It’s easy for me to know when boundaries are being crossed. I can feel it. It feels…well, bad. My blood pressure goes up, I lose sleep I feel angry. Maybe, my student is always being picked up late, or tuition isn’t being paid on time. It could be that my time and space is not being respected. Maybe it’s something blatantly disrespectful or maybe it’s a situation that has become more and more upsetting over time. This is why I am presenting “Scripted Communication for Sticky Situations”.

read the post “Piano Studio Etiquette 101”

I have been teaching for over 35 years. In my home studio, at commercial studios, online and as a teacher who travels to student’s homes. It’s been a great career! I have met so many amazing families. Occasionally I have run into some sticky situations. Over the years I have learned to be a better communicator. I have gained some insight into how to set boundaries and, make my expectations known. This has made me a much happier teacher and a happier person in general. In this post, I will present some situations that come up, from time to time and how I handle them. Feel free to take what you think will work for you and leave the rest.

Continue reading “Scripted Communication for Sticky Situations”

Ten Ways to Make Your Piano Studio More Profitable

I don’t know about you, but I feel like things are getting more and more expensive and money is getting harder and harder to come by. As piano teachers, we don’t get raises every year, (neither do most workers these days). Many teachers are nervous about raising rates, in fact, many teachers I know have not raised lesson prices in years. This post will focus on Ten ways to make your piano studio more profitable without raising lesson rates. I’m not talking about a few dollars here and there. These relatively painless tips can increase the profitability of your piano studio by thousands of dollars per year.

Continue reading “Ten Ways to Make Your Piano Studio More Profitable”

What Kind of Piano Teacher are You?

What Kind of Piano Teacher am I?

Take the Quiz below

 

I my last blog post “Still Trying to Please Everyone? Stop it! You Can’t” I describe an incident with the parent of a prospective student. This particular parent questioned how and why I teach the way I do. This got me to thinking, why do I teach scales and arpeggios after my students have learned to read music? Should I include more technique? Are my music theory books good enough? Am I strict enough? I find my self-asking myself, “what kind of piano teacher are you anyway?”

Something New Every Week

It seems as though every week I come across some new teaching idea. Some way of doing things I hadn’t thought of before. Just last Friday I went to a lecture on piano technique given by Nancy Bachus, whoa!! I thought I knew a lot about piano technique. After hearing her, I think to myself there’s definitely room for me to up my game on that front. I wonder what else I can improve.

Then there’s Facebook. So many cool things, great music, and awesome opinions. It literally makes my head spin (OK not literally). But it can be overwhelming, and at times I find myself questioning my teaching. What kind of piano teacher am I anyway?

What Kind of Piano Teacher am I?

Continue reading “What Kind of Piano Teacher are You?”

10 Ways to Make Your Piano Studio More Profitable Without Raising Rates

 

I don’t know about you, but I feel like things are getting more and more expensive and money is getting harder and harder to come by. As piano teachers, we don’t get raises every year, (neither do most workers these days). Many teachers are nervous about raising rates, in fact, many teachers I know have not raised lesson prices in years. This post will focus on 10 ways to make your piano studio more profitable without raising lesson rates. I’m not talking about a few dollars here and there. These relatively painless tips can increase the profitability of your piano studio by thousands of dollars per year. Yes, you can make your piano studio more profitable!

 

  1. Educate Parents.

    The number one way to have a vibrant profitable studio is to make sure that your adult students and your student’s parents understand what is involved in learning to play the piano. When people understand the benefits of playing the piano and what it takes to learn to play well they will become students who will attend lessons regularly, purchase the necessary materials, and stick with the piano.

  2. Have a Studio Policy.

    Have a studio policy that excludes or limits make-up lessons. Stick to your studio policy this will ensure that your studio will run smoothly and you will get paid for all of the lessons you are supposed to be teaching.

    Piano Studio Policies

  1. Bill monthly, semester or yearly tuition.

    Don’t allow your students to pay weekly. Charging periodically will decrease missed lessons and make your piano studio more profitable.

  2. Use the internet.

    Using Skype or FaceTime for times when students can’t make it to a lesson because of inclement weather, sudden illness of a sibling or car trouble will keep your studio attendance up and therefore increase your studios’ profitability.

  3. Charge a Recital Fee.

    It’s your valuable time that makes it all happen. You should be compensated. Make sure you charge over and above what you will be paying if you are renting a venue. Charge a per-student fee or sell tickets to the event.

  4. Have a yearly activity fee.

    If you would rather not charge extra for things like recitals and supplemental materials consider having students pay a yearly activity fee to cover the cost of these things.

  1. Teach at Home.

    Teaching at home is the most profitable way to run a one person, private piano studio. Not only does this eliminate the overhead of renting a space, and the time and expense of traveling to student’s homes, in the U.S. you can actually use your home studio space as an income tax write off, making your piano studio more profitable.

  2. Use Technology and Double-Up.

    Consider having 2 students share an hour lesson (semi-private). One student works on things like music theory, music history, and note reading while the other receives his/her lesson. There are many ways to do this easily with both students in the same room. Charge each student less than you would for an hour-long lesson and a little more than you would for 30 minutes. Everyone wins!

  3. Make Use of Summer and School Breaks.

    For most piano teachers, lesson attendance takes a nosedive during summer school breaks. Encourage students to continue lessons over the summer. Offer to teach students of colleagues who usually take the summer off. Consider offering intensive lessons where a student comes every day for individualized instruction for a week or two. Small group classes in things like improvisation or music history are also a great way to make your piano studio more profitable. If your student will be away for the summer, offer to teach lessons online via Skype or Facetime. This will make you piano studio more profitable.

  4. Sell piano books and materials to your students.
  5. Teachers can earn up to 10% of the price of most piano books by selling them to their students. Or…you can download and print Paloma Piano’s method books and materials put them into a binder and sell them to your students. Either way, if you have been giving books and materials to your students charging for these things will make your piano studio more profitable without raising lesson rates. Learn more about Paloma Piano 

    Read the post “The Best Piano Teacher in Town”

 

The Bottom Line

Just how much more profitable can you make your studio? I did a rough estimate and here is what I came up with:

Of course, lesson rates and studio size vary. I am basing this estimate on a studio of 30 students at a rate of $25 per 30-minute lesson during the 10 month school year.

Billing monthly, charging periodically and limit or eliminating make-up lessons.

If you usually have 10% of you students canceling or skipping lessons in a given month this will increase your studio’s profits by $300 per month or $3,000 per year.

A modest recital fee of just $10 per student will earn your studio an extra $600 per year.

A $50 per year activity fee will increase your studio’s income by $1,500 every year.

Offering semi-private lessons at $120 per month per student will increase your studio’s profits by a whopping $6,000 per year! (This will save parents $4,000 over the cost of a one hour lesson).

Taking advantage of summer and schools breaks can realistically increase your studio’s profitability by $3,000-$5,000.

If the average student spends about $50.00 yearly on books and supplemental music you can increase your studio’s income by $300 if you are using traditional piano method books and $1,500 using Paloma Piano’s piano printable method books and materials.

Teaching at home can really boost your income if you are not already doing this. I know this is impossible for some teachers because of where they live or other considerations. I also know that some teachers are studio owners who are running very successful studios from commercial spaces. However, if you are a traveling teacher or you work for a studio consider teaching from home if possible. The tax deduction alone could increase your piano studio’s profits by about $1,000 per year.

If you travel consider the time you spend getting from student to student and the gas and wear and tear on your car. Teaching from 3pm-7pm at home you would be finished by 7 pm and earn $200. If you travel leaving just 15 minutes to get from house to house you would earn just $125 minus the gas and wear and tear on your car. This would reduce your hourly rate from $50 to approximately $30 per hour.

The factors of time and 30-minute lesson rate being equal moving your studio to your home would increase your profitability by $1,200 per month or $12,000 per year!

To equal what you would earn teaching at home traveling you would have to charge $45 per 30-minute lesson.

If you work at a studio that takes half of the lesson rate teaching at your home could increase your piano studio’s profits by $15,000 per year!

As you can see all of these ideas can potentially add up to some serious money for your studio. I sincerely believe earning a good living as a piano teacher begins with educating students and parents about what it is that we do. If people can see how much work and expertise is involved in they will value piano education and be willing to pay for it. When it comes right down to it to quote a famous commercial “An educated consumer is your best costumer”.

If you would like to make your piano studio more profitable without raising rates. Check out all of our free printable piano games, music, and resources. Become a Paloma Piano Gold member today!!

Visit our sister site for students and parents pianoparents.net

How to Draft a Piano Studio Policy

There are always questions coming up about studio policies. Recently I was asked to help draft a studio policy for the Arts Center where I teach. The idea was to come up with several different options and decide on which type of policy would work best for all of the teachers involved. I thought I would share these ideas with all of you. Here are some ways to draft a piano studio policy.

In my home studio, I am much more, flexible with my students. This is because I need to travel often to see my family in another state. Being flexible works for me right now.

The bottom line is all teachers need a studio policy so that everyone is clear about what is expected. As the teacher and studio owner, you have the right to set the policy that works best for your situation.

Drafting your studio policy

These studio policy options deal with cancelations and make-ups. But in drafting your own policy you also want to consider how you want to collect payments (weekly, monthly or by semester). What to do about late arrivals and pick-ups and studio etiquette issues. You also need to address things like inclement weather, holidays etc.

 

Definitions

A “No Show” is a lesson that is missed without notifying the teacher/studio prior to the start of the lesson time.

A “Missed lesson” is a lesson canceled within 24 hours of the lesson time.

A “Rescheduled lesson” is a that is changed and rescheduled with 24 hours or more advanced notice.

My goal is to set up a situation that optimizes student learning and does not refund monies collected for lessons.

“No show” lessons will not be made up.

Lessons can be rescheduled if given 24 hours or more advanced notice.

I also assume that teacher canceled lessons will be made up as a private lesson.

So we are basically talking about “Missed Lessons”

 

 

Option 1

Allow students to make up lessons.

This means deciding which missed lessons will be made up and how many. I have seen studios set a certain number of allowed make-up per semester. Or only provide make-ups for lessons canceled with 24 hours notice or in the case of an emergency.

Pros;

It’s flexible, parents love this option.

Teachers usually don’t mind if there is a set number of make-ups allowed so that their schedule isn’t disrupted too much and students get a weekly lesson.

Teachers who gig a lot need flexible schedules.

Cons;

Sometimes hard to enforce because it’s hard to know what really constitutes an emergency and who really is sick.

Scheduling make-ups sometimes becomes a problem because of a teacher’s schedule and other activities in which a child may be involved.(In my experience when this happens parents always want refunds or credits).

As the studio grows it will become increasingly difficult to find space for make-ups to take place. (The last studio I worked at had 300 students and 4 piano rooms. It was difficult to find open rooms in which to conduct make-up lessons).

Teachers really hate to come in stay for 5 hours get paid for 3 and then have to return on another day to make up lessons. (I believe this is the number one biggest problem studios and private teachers alike deal with).

Read the post “Best Piano Teacher in Town”

Option 2

Offer Group make up lessons.

How it works.

Students who miss a lesson during a certain period (usually monthly) sign up to come to a group class which serves as a makeup for the missed lesson. These classes are conducted by the teacher. Classes can be recorded for students who are unable to make the class time.

Pros;

Students get to expand their musical horizons with music history or music appreciation.

Teachers never do makeups.

Money never has to be refunded

The group class is twice as long as the regular lesson so students get an extra half hour of instruction.

Cons;

Takes some advanced planning and coordinating

Space is needed for the classes

Some teachers/students may not be able to fit it into their schedule.

Option 3

How to draft a piano studio policy.

Include makeup lessons into the existing tuition,

How it works,

It’s actually mostly psychological (if you ask me). If a unit of 16 lessons is $600 you say that the unit is 14 lessons plus two bonus lessons for makeup lessons. Which means they get (or think they get) two free lessons if they have perfect attendance.

Pros;

No makeups

No refunds

Encourages perfect attendance.

Limits missed lessons

Cons;

If the student misses two lessons his misses the instructional time.

 

Option 4

No makeups.

Pros;

No makes ups

No refunds

Cons;

Doesn’t really seem fair to parents (although many teachers and studios are going to this model)

The student’s don’t really get anything out of it.

Some parents miss lessons and don’t worry about it because “After all the teacher is getting paid” so the student loses out on valuable instruction.

 

Option 5

Use a Google calendar or similar application that allows parents to check in and swap lessons with one another.

How it works,

 

Pros;

This takes the responsibility of rescheduling off of the teacher.

Teachers do not need to give refunds for missed lessons.

Parents like it because they can have make-up lessons when needed.

 

Cons;

Parents have to agree to be part of the swap arrangement.

Most parents will want to be accommodated if they can’t find an opening

in the schedule for their lesson to be made-up.

These are the 5 basic models I have experience with. We could do one or some combination of them. Ultimately it is your decision. You need to do what works best for you and your family. In my experience, most people will accept and abide by your studio policy as long as you are clear about what you expect and ready to hold your ground. This is how to draft a piano studio policy.

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Visit Our sister site for students and parents pianoparents.net

10 Ways to Make your Piano Studio More Profitable

 

I don’t know about you, but I feel like things are getting more and more expensive and money is getting harder and harder to come by. As piano teachers, we do not get raises every year (neither do most workers these days). Most teachers I know are nervous about raising rates, in fact, many teachers I know have not raised lesson prices in years. This post will focus on 10 ways to make your piano studio more profitable without raising lesson rates. I’m not talking about a few dollars here and there. These relatively painless tips can make your piano studio more profitable and increase your income by thousands of dollars per year.

Educate Parents.

The number one way to have a vibrant profitable studio is to make sure that your adult students and your student’s parents understand what is involved in learning to play the piano. When people understand the benefits of playing the piano and what it takes to learn to play well they will become students who will attend lessons regularly, purchase the necessary materials, and stick with the piano. These things are ways to make your piano studio more profitable.

Have a Studio Policy.

Have a studio policy that excludes or limits make-up lessons. Stick to your studio policy this will ensure that your studio will run smoothly and you will get paid for all of the lessons you are supposed to be teaching.

Read about “Piano Studio Policies”

Bill monthly  Semester or yearly tuition.

Don’t allow your students to pay weekly. Charging periodically will decrease missed lessons and make your piano studio more profitable.

Use the internet.

Using Skype or FaceTime for times when students can’t make it to a lesson because of inclement weather, sudden illness of a sibling or car trouble will keep your studio attendance up and therefore increase your studios’ profitability.

Charge a Recital Fee.

It’s your valuable time that makes it all happen. You should be compensated. Make sure you charge over and above what you will be paying if you are renting a venue. Charge a per-student fee or sell tickets to the event.Have a yearly activity fee. If you would rather not charge extra for things like recitals and supplemental materials consider having students pay a yearly activity fee to cover the cost of these things. A modest recital fee of just $10 per student will earn your studio an extra $600 per year.

Teach at Home.

Teaching at home is the most profitable way to run a one person, private piano studio. Not only does this eliminate the overhead of renting a space, and the time and expense of traveling to student’s homes, in the U.S. you can actually use your home studio space as an income tax write off, making your piano studio more profitable.Use Technology and Double-Up. Consider having 2 students share an hour lesson (semi-private). One student works on things like music theory, music history, and note reading while the other receives his/her lesson. There are many ways to do this easily with both students in the same room. Charge less than you would for an hour-long lesson and a little more than you would for 30 minutes. Everyone wins

Read the post “The Best Piano Teacher in Town”

Make Use of Summer and School Breaks.

For most piano teachers lesson attendance takes a nosedive during summer time school breaks. Encourage students to continue lessons over the summer. Offer to teach students of colleagues who usually take the summer off. Consider offering intensive lessons where a student comes every day for individualized instruction for a week or two. Small group classes in things like improvisation or music history are also a great way to make your piano studio more profitable.

Sell piano books and materials to your students.

Teachers can earn up to 10% of the price of most piano books by selling them to their students. Or…you can download and print Paloma Piano’s method books and materials put them into a binder and sell them to your students. Either way, if you have been giving books and materials to your students charging for these things will make your piano studio more profitable without raising lesson rates.

Just how much more profitable can you make your studio? I did a rough estimate and here is what I came up with:

Of course, lesson rates and studio size vary. I am basing this estimate on a studio of 30 students at a rate of $25 per 30-minute lesson during the 10 month school year.

 

Limit or eliminate make-up lessons.

If you usually have 10% of you students canceling or skipping lessons in a given month this tip will increase your studio’s profits by $300 per month or $3,000 per year.

 

A modest recital fee of just $10 per student will earn your studio an extra $600 per year.

A $50 per year activity fee will increase your studio’s income by$1,500

Offering semi-private lessons at $120 per month per student will increase your studio’s profits by a whopping $6,000 per year! (This will save parents $4,000 over the cost of a one hour lesson).

Taking advantage of summer and schools breaks can really increase your studio’s profitability by $3,000-$5,000.

If the average student spends about $50.00 yearly on books and supplemental music you can increase your studio’s income by $300 if you are using traditional piano method books and $1,500 using Paloma Piano’s piano method books and materials.

Teaching at home can really boost your income if you are not already doing this. I know this is impossible for some teachers because of where they live or other considerations. I also know that some teachers are studio owners who are running very successful studios from commercial spaces. However, if you are a traveling teacher or you work for a studio consider teaching from home if possible. The tax deduction alone could increase your piano studio’s profits by about $1,000 per year.

If you travel consider the time you spend getting from student to student and the gas and wear and tear on your car. Teaching from 3pm-7pm at home you would be finished by 7 pm and earn $200. If you travel leaving just 15 minutes to get from house to house you would earn just $125 minus the gas and wear and tear on your car. This would reduce your hourly rate from $50 to approximately $30 per hour.

The factors of time and 30-minute lesson rate being equal moving your studio to your home would increase your profitability by $1,200 per month or $12,000 per year!

To equal what you would earn teaching at home traveling you would have to charge $45 per 30-minute lesson.

If you work at a studio that takes half of the lesson rate teaching at your home could increase your piano studio’s profits by $15,000 per year!

As you can see all of these ideas can potentially add up to some serious money for your studio. I sincerely believe earning a good living as a piano teacher begins with educating students and parents about what it is that we do. If people can see how much work and expertise is involved in they will value piano education and be willing to pay for it. When it comes right down to it to quote a famous commercial “An educated consumer is your best costumer”.

If you like this post please share it. For hundreds of pages of free piano music and resources for your studio. Join Paloma Piano’s Forever Free Gold Membership today.

Why Do We Need a Piano and What Type Should We Get?

Why do we need a piano and what type should we get? Students need a piano because they need to be able to practice at home. Learning to play any musical instrument is a big undertaking that depends upon regular lessons and daily practice. It takes practice to understand musical concepts and to acquire the coordination and motor skills it takes to become a pianist. 

What Should We Get?

There are basically two types of pianos, Acoustic and Digital. First, let’s look at Acoustic Pianos.

Acoustic Pianos are made of wood and have steel strings. An acoustic piano is a great choice if you have space in your home to accommodate one and if you can afford it. Concert artists always play on fine acoustic pianos and almost all pianists prefer them. Acoustic pianos need periodic tuning, however, this is a minimal expense. If carefully chosen and properly cared for, an acoustic piano is an investment that will last a lifetime.

It is important to know that acoustic pianos vary wildly in price, quality, and condition. In order to be useful for piano practice, an acoustic piano must be a new or a well maintained pre-owned piano. You must also look for a reputable brand of instrument. Acoustic pianos have over 10,000 moving parts, these parts wear out if not properly maintained. I always recommend that families get help when selecting an acoustic piano. Consult your teacher. He/she can certainly point you in the right direction and help with your piano selection.

Digital Pianos

Digital Pianos are electronic instruments. Digital pianos have a full set of 88 weighted keys. The weights inside the keys make these instruments feel more like acoustic pianos when played. They also have an assortment of different sounds and computer interface capabilities.

Digital Pianos have improved greatly in price and quality over the past 20 years. In my opinion, a good quality digital piano with its own case and bench for proper seating is a good option for families that do not have space and budget for an acoustic piano. Digital pianos also vary in price and quality, so please consult your teacher before purchasing a digital piano.

Keyboards

Keyboards are not pianos and are not acceptable for piano practice. They do not sound or feel like a piano and practicing on a keyboard will be discouraging and will foster bad habits. I would also prefer that my students forgo practice on a keyboard and concentrate on the lessons in “First Four Week Before a Piano” (coming soon) rather than practice on a keyboard. In my 30 plus years of teaching, I have seen that keyboards just don’t work. Piano students need pianos.

There are many many affordable options when it comes to getting a piano. You can rent or buy. Some of my students have even received nice pianos from friends or relatives. The bottom line is that the sooner you get a good quality piano the better.

If you would like free printable music

Visit our sister site for students and parents pianoparents.net

Discovering Peace and Prosperity

I am so honored and excited to present this guest post from my friend and colleague Sarah Buckley, owner of Keys to Success. In addition to being a piano teacher, Sarah uses her business and organizational know how to help musician entrepreneurs to who are discovering  peace and prosperity.

Discovering Peace and Prosperity

By Sarah Buckley

As musician entrepreneurs, we are specially equipped. We have been trained to practice long hours, always look for improvement, and appreciate the sweet joy of music every day. On the flip side, we are often also trained to be accustomed to long, crazy busy days, last minute changes, and sacrificing for our art. Some of this training is amazing for running a business. Some, not so much.

Last year, I applied my hunger for constant improvement to big life changes. You might be able to relate to feeling like you have to choose between a balanced family life with a ‘9-5 job’ or following the call of music and resorting to a less balanced family life. With the help of a mentor, I set out to follow my call AND create balance.

“Tiny hinges swing huge doors.” – Ray Edwards

Continue reading “Discovering Peace and Prosperity”

Time to Say Goodbye

How and When to Let Go of a Piano Student

Ashley is an eighth-grader and she’s one of my favorite students. She’s been coming to lessons every week for the last five years and had been doing pretty well. Until lately. She missed a few weeks of practicing…and then a few more. It’s been taking her forever to learn a new piece. I’m finding myself looking for easier and easier music for her to play, and trying to find ways to motivate her. Nothing is working. Time is going by. There’s no denying it. We’re going backward, and we’ve been going backward for the past year. I’m losing her. It’s time to say goodbye.

Continue reading “Time to Say Goodbye”